html web site building

HOME HEATING OIL TANK CLEANUP

Cleanup of home heating oil tank leakage. Phone: (732) 291-5030; Tulmark.com

Oil Tank Cleanup

"It's easier than you think to cleanup an oil tank spill. And in some situations a cleanup may not be necessary even if oil has leaked from the tank." "And because people don't know the rules they end up paying more".

State of New Jersey has structured the regulations regarding home heating oil tank cleanups to make it easier for home owners.

Tulmark, LLC. Is licensed by the State of New Jersey to work on any home heating oil tank.


Tulmark, LLC can:

  1. Test Home Heating Oil Tanks
  2. Remove or Install Home Heating Oil Tanks
  3. Cleanup Home Heating Oil Tanks


It’s easier than you think to cleanup an oil tank spill. And in some situations a cleanup may not be necessary even if oil has leaked from the tank. But most tank cleanup contractors don't know this; or don't want to know this. They want to dynamite your house and dig to China! It seems like overkill is the norm for most oil tank remediation contractors. And because people don't know the rules they end up paying more than they should.


State of New Jersey has structured the regulations regarding home heating oil tank cleanups to make it easier. For example; if a residential oil tank leak is less than 1000 parts per million (that's a lot) and there is a clean zone of at least 2 feet before encountering groundwater then a cleanup is not necessary. So testing is really what tells you whether a cleanup is necessary or not.


The State of New Jersey has structured the regulations regarding heating oil tanks so as to put as little stress on homeowners as possible with regard to oil tank cleanup. The State regulations are configured in a step-by-step process so as to make the cleanup as easy as possible on the home owner. But most oil tank cleanup contractors don't know this. Most oil tank remediation contractors want to jack the house up and dig under the foundation and have the homeowners out of the home (the home owners usually end up living in a hotel somewhere for months!) This is rarely necessary.

The key is to determine if a cleanup is even necessary is through testing of the soil under the oil tank. Soil samples are collected from underneath the tanks once it is removed or from next to and below the tanks before it is removed. The soil samples are sent to a third party laboratory licensed in the State of New Jersey for analysis. If the lab analysis shows the soil analysis to be less than 1000 parts per million and you 2 feet or more above the ground water table. Then a cleanup is not necessary.


Almost all residential heating oil tanks are either 550 gallons or 1000 gallons in size. The diameter of a 550 or 1000 gallon home heating oil tank is 4 feet. The burial depth of a 550 or 1000 gallon tank is 3 feet below the surface. That makes the bottom level of the home heating oil tank only 7 feet below the ground surface. And the average ground water depth is around 12 feet below ground surface. So that gives you 5 feet before ground water in most cases. This is why in many cases a cleanup is not even necessary.


And even if laboratory soil sample results show heating oil is greater than 1000 parts per million, there is a second screening test to determine if a cleanup is necessary. This is to complete an additional analysis on the soil for naphthalene and 2-methylhaphthalene. If analysis for these two chemical compounds is below the New Jersey standards then once again; a cleanup is not necessary.


For the third check to see if a cleanup is necessary because of 2-methylnaphthalene one can have the lab complete a SPLP (Synthetic Precipitation Leachate Procedure) analysis on the soil sample. And if that analysis falls below the New Jersey State standard of 390 parts per billion then a cleanup is not necessary.

FOLLOW US